3D Scanning on a grand scale, for grand purposes

by Marty Crossland on November 13, 2011

In an earlier post I wrote about the new technology of 3D printers, by which solid 3D objects can be scanned and reproduced faithfully. I just recently discovered an additional new 3D scanning technology that can scan entire archeological sites with amazing accuracy. Its inventor, Ben Kacyra, is applying it to the recording and preservation of what he calls “heritage sites,” such as Mt. Rushmore. He has recently launched an initiative to complete 500 such projects of worldwide significance during the next five years. He recounts a story of how his team had only recently completed the recording of an ancient African tomb, only to have it destroyed soon thereafter by suspected arsonists. Because of his organization’s efforts, the site is being considered for an accurate reconstruction and restoration project.

My thoughts immediately went to applications for recording, preserving, and sharing for education the most significant sites of biblical archaeology, particularly those at highest risk to destruction or loss for various reasons.

I applaud and marvel at the scale, intricacy, and intentions of this notable and worthy project. Be sure and watch until the very end, when a “live” scan of the presentation room and audience is revealed! Enjoy!

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