Do you trust Google with your privacy? Maybe you shouldn’t.

by Marty Crossland on March 25, 2012

I just finished reading a fairly new book by Scott Cleland titled, Search and Destroy: Why You Can’t Trust Search And Destroy book coverGoogle, Inc.

I knew I already had personal misgivings about Google. However, this book verified and magnified my concerns. As an information systems and security technology professional, my initial misgivings were from my gut. My second set came when I read on a discussion group of technology professionals that Google had recently declared that groups that “discriminated in hiring practices using religion or sexual orientation” would no longer qualify for free or reduced-fee access to Google’s products, including Google Docs. This effectively removed this benefit for churches. You can read more about this shift in corporate policy in a recent article from Christianity Today, entitled “Google Cuts Churches out of Non-Profit Program.” What this article said to me is, “Google has turned hostile toward Christian organizations.” This fact is also documented in Mr. Cleland’s book.

You can read for yourself Google’s information page for non-profits. Pay particular attention to the statement:

“Google reserves the right to grant or deny an organization’s application or participation at any time, for any reason, and to supplement or amend these eligibility guidelines at any time. Selections are made at Google’s sole discretion,  and are not subject to external review. “

So they tell us right up front they they are reserving the right to be capriciously discriminatory, without recourse on our part.

The book cites many, many examples of why we all should be concerned, if not alarmed, at Google’s enormous power and influence in the marketplace. The author even exposes Google’s capability, even its intent to influence the policies of world governments and even elections with this power. The book is exceptionally well documented with over 700 footnoted references.

Finally, I found this recent discussion about this topic on www.TheBlaze.com. I hope you will find it as interesting and informative as I did.

(8 minutes)

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