Motivation

Hand-drawn illustration of a talk and making it a video

by Marty Crossland on January 5, 2011

In an earlier post, I shared Mr. Daniel Pink’s talk on his book, Drive. I discovered this additional version of the presentation. I believe it is the same audio track, but an organization named RSA has modified the video to be a very innovative, hand-drawn-on-a-whiteboard illustration of the talk. I find it fascinating for its communicative value. The site where you can see more illustrated talks is www.theRSA.org.

Here is the illustrated talk:

{ 0 comments }

DRiVE: What motivates us (and our students)

by Marty Crossland on June 1, 2010

I have become quite a fan of Daniel Pink. In an earlier entry here, I shared his presentations on his book A Whole New Mind: How Right Brainers Will Rule the Future. In this entry, I want to share a recent TED presentation he made about his newest book, DRiVE: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us.

Here he shares what science has been telling us for years about intrinsic versus extrinsic motivation. Management science in business, at least until fairly recently, has focused mostly on reward-punishment extrinsic motivational approaches (bonuses, commissions, contingent salary raises, etc.) to try to coax better performance from workers — and we as teachers, I believe, tend to expect similarly motivated behaviors from our students.

However, Dan points out that decades of research proves that people perform best when they are intrinsically motivated — for the enjoyment and/or fulfillment provided by the activity itself. Three important components of intrinsic motivation are Autonomy, Mastery, and Purpose.

I encourage you to watch the following presentation and read the book to learn more about this fascinating topic.

{ 0 comments }

Freedom Isn’t Free

by Marty Crossland on May 31, 2010

Freedom isn’t free. But I fear that an increasing number of citizens of our nation are losing the essence of this truism. Today, Memorial Day, has caused me to reflect on this. As I am writing this I am watching a rebroadcast of HBO’s “Band of Brothers” docu-drama about servicemen in World War II.

My own father served honorably in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. In the past several months I have been taking every opportunity I can find to personally express my gratitude and appreciation to veterans and to soldiers currently in service to our nation. Here are some examples. A few days ago I had breakfast with a friend in Tulsa, and there was a Vietnam veteran having breakfast alone (I could tell by the cap he was wearing). As I departed the restaurant,  I went by his table, offered him a handshake and thanked him for his service. He seemed surprised, but he obviously thought well of it. As I was passing through a major airport a few weeks ago, several uniformed soldiers were hanging around waiting for their flight, and I passed among them shaking hands and expressing my appreciation to each one. They didn’t seem to mind at all. One said, “No problem.” Another said, “It’s an honor to serve, sir.” I also take advantage of similar opportunities to say thanks to law enforcement officers and firefighters, whenever I can do so without interfering with their duties. I don’t make a big deal out of it. I simply look them in the eyes and offer a short, sincere “thank you” for what they do. To date, not a single one has seemed bothered by this — on the contrary, all have received the sentiments well, albeit with some showing apparent surprise.

I invite everyone who reads this to join me in these personal expressions of thanks and appreciation. It will help both you and the recipient of your gratitude to have a better day.

This video is a good reminder of the sacrifices we are thanking them for.

{ 0 comments }

The Push

by Marty Crossland on May 11, 2010

The video below really has nothing to do with “teaching with technology.” However, as an educator and as a parent I was quite captivated by its message.

As we seek to educate, motivate, and inspire our students, we may need to remind ourselves from time to time that an important gift we have to offer those under our care and instruction is,

a push.

Enjoy!

{ 0 comments }

Millennials are more educated, but less employed

by Marty Crossland on February 24, 2010

Studies about millennials (young people born between 1980 and 1995 or 2000, depending on whose definition you use) are revealing that many of them now have a high level of education. But rather than take their knowledge and skills into the workplace, many are choosing to put their time and talents into altruistic endeavors, and striving to make a difference in their world.

For more background on the Millennials and what they tend to believe and do, see my earlier post: What is is with our students? The Millennials are here!

Read the article from USA Today at this link: Millennials.

Watch this video from CBS News to get an update:

{ 0 comments }

A whole new way of thinking

January 20, 2010 Digital Culture

Author and speaker Daniel Pink has completed some very provocative work on trends in business and the economy. He is a hugely entertaining speaker, especially when he shares that he was a woefully unsuccessful student in law school. Dan shares three macro-level drivers of 21st century careers: Abundance Asia Automation This talk was delivered around […]

Read the full article →

What is it with our students? The millennials are here!

November 2, 2009 Effective Learning

I first saw this video a year or so ago and was intrigued. We are now having a conversation in our church board about how to relate to young people of the millennial generation. I have also been in multiple discussions with other faculty members about what “the millennials factor” could mean for our teaching […]

Read the full article →

The surprising science of motivation

September 30, 2009 Effective Learning

Business analyst Daniel Pink recently gave this talk at the TED conference at Oxford University. In it he challenges us to rethink what we believe about motivation, rewards, and what makes people tick. Try to apply what he says to the classroom and beyond, to try and understand what motivates our students to excel and […]

Read the full article →