Hand-drawn illustration of a talk and making it a video

In an earlier post, I shared Mr. Daniel Pink’s talk on his book, Drive. I discovered this additional version of the presentation. I believe it is the same audio track, but an organization named RSA has modified the video to be a very innovative, hand-drawn-on-a-whiteboard illustration of the talk. I find it fascinating for its communicative value. The site where you can see more illustrated talks is www.theRSA.org.

Here is the illustrated talk:

Using free online videos for teaching and learning

Here is a good article about how a number of higher education instructors are using freely available online video to enhance the learning experience for their students:

Instructional Video for the Budget-Constrained Classroom

I have similarly employed online videos that I didn’t produce myself into my own courses. Not mentioned in the article is a special educator’s video site dedicated to teachers, called TeacherTube. Although a lot of it is aimed more at K-12 teachers than higher education, you should check it out as well. Yet another source for inspirational and faith-based videos is GodTube (also known as tangle.com). Another useful site is Vimeo, although you may need to search a little harder to find what you might be interested in.

For example, here is a clever video on Vimeo, created by a high school senior as part of his class assignment, to encourage other students to take Calculus. Enjoy!

Calculus Video from Brian Sewell on Vimeo.

From the student author: “At the end of my senior year in high school, our Calculus class had nothing more to do after we had taken our AP exams, so our teacher tried to fill the time with a small “busy work” project. She wanted us to make something practical to help teach Calculus to other students. Lots of people just made posters with a definition on it, others worked a little harder and made a board game… Justin Hendricks and I made a rap. We recorded it and played it for the class before the thing was due, but we weren’t finished yet. We decided to make a video accompanied by a music video portion to show the class. Since we graduated, our video has been played every semester in everyone’s Calculus classes. Gotta love it.”

Speaking metaphorically

Author James Geary presented an interesting talk at TED, pointing out that we typically use about four to six metaphors a minute whenever we’re in an engaging conversation. He has done some formal study of the use of metaphors throughout history.

As you watch this presentation, note also his use of some fairly new presentation software called Prezi. Prezi lets you build a presentation as a single large canvas, and then zoom and rotate to the various sections during the presentation.

From the TED website:

About this talk

Aphorism enthusiast and author James Geary waxes on a fascinating fixture of human language: the metaphor. Friend of scribes from Aristotle to Elvis, metaphor can subtly influence the decisions we make, Geary says. Lost jobs, wayward lovers, wars and famine — come to think of it, just about any of life’s curveballs — there’s an aphorism for it, and James Geary’s got it.

About James Geary

One of a handful of the world’s professional aphorists, James Geary has successfully fused early creative endeavors in performance art, poetry and juggling with his childhood fascination with the “Quotable Quotes” column in Reader’s Digest. His books Geary’s Guide to the World’s Great Aphorists and the bestselling The World in a Phrase are invaluable journeys through the often-ignored art of the witty (and memorably brief) summation.

His next book is about the secret life of metaphors, and how metaphorical thinking drives invention and creativity. Geary is a former writer for Time Europe and is now an editor for Ode magazine, a print and online publication devoted to optimism and positive news.

Christmas ReTooned

I would like to join many others in encouraging all of us to remember the real meaning of Christmas. no matter what our stereotypes of the events surrounding the first Christmas, let’s never lose sight of the fact that is was no doubt one of the most important events in all of history.

I hope you enjoy this short video, “Retooning the Nativity.” Blessings to you.

[EZWebPlayer VideoID=bc53bfc0-0ff5-439a-8a01-fa00de1d3ddd/]
 
Downloads and DVDs are available at http://www.ignitermedia.com.

Embedding video in a Desire2Learn course

Often I find it desireable to include a video from the Internet into a course I’m teaching. Thanks to the new Web 2.0 technologies, it is possible to provide high quality videos direct to our students without needing to do a lot of production work ourselves. And the way many videos are being published on the Internet, we don’t even need to ask permission or get copyright clearance!

The trick is to look for online videos that have some kind of “Share” button or link mounted on or near the video panel. With that button you can copy a short line of computer code that you simply paste into your web page (in Desire2Learn or other learning management system, into your blog, into a PowerPoint presentation or wherever). Then each time the Play button is clicked by a student, the video actually streams from the server you found it on, in real time. No need to copy the video or otherwise handle it — it simply comes to your site each time it’s viewed.

In this short video, one of our colleages shows us how to accomplish this easy task. Go on and try it. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised how easy it is.

An important side note: We have discovered that, at the time of this writing, this process will not work correctly if you are using the Internet Explorer browser. For the time being it will be best to use the Firefox browser, which you can download for free at www.firefox.com.

Emotionally intelligent signage

I have recently discovered the work of Daniel Pink. He is a business writer, and a master storyteller who encourages others to be the same. In this short pecha-kucha presentation (what’s that? — see another post in this blog) on “emotionally intelligent signage,’ where he encourages anyone creating signs to help others find their way to do so in an intelligent way that also touches our senses in addition to providing information.

This presentation has caused me to rethink how we provide instructions to our students, especially regarding how they should navigate through a course in a typical learning management system like Desire2Learn or Blackboard. Perhaps we should take some cues from Mr. Pink.

Watch this short presentation (7 minutes) with thoughtful reflection about how you communicate instructional material to your students.

Linked data — the next Web generation

Tim Berners-Lee recently gave a presentation at a TED conference on what he sees as the next generation of the Web — Linked Data. He sees organizations and even us as individuals contributing to a growing, well-organized (albeit organically) repository of raw data. This is being fueled by the exponential expansion of social networking and social media sites on the Web.

This talk (in the video below) is only a little bit “techie”, and I think everyone who has used the Internet at all recently can find relevance in it. Berners-Lee is one of the two “real” inventors of the Internet (note: they did NOT talk to Al Gore first!), so his thoughts here should be considered very significant.

By the way, TED (www.ted.com) is a great source of short presentations by expert accomplished speakers. Students would do well to study the presentations there to get ideas for how to make their own presentations.

The State of Creativity — OETA television series

The OETA educational TV network has begun airing a wonderful series on Creativity in the state of Oklahoma, entitled “State of Creativity.” It is of special interest to me because in episode 102, first aired last night (March 17), they highlight the providers of some exciting virtual reality business education curricula that I am currently using. Vertical Learning Curve is creating a full MBA curriculum using its virtual reality technology, which we are adapting for selected undergraduate courses in our online B.S. in Business Administration program.

You can learn more about VLC and the courses at www.vlcglobal.com.

This segment also features an intriguing approach to teaching creativity being used now at the University of Tulsa, called StudioBlue. You can get more information on the entire OETA series at creativity.oeta.tv, and about the Oklahoma Creativity Project at www.stateofcreativity.com.

Enjoy the video!

Technology for creating screen capture videos

I’ve been using screen capture software from TechSmith for several years to create videos, static graphic images, and more for sharing with students and colleagues. I have created whole courses built around creative ways of packaging narrated screen videos.

In this video, the makers of this software are interviewed about the latest developments in this technology arena. I thought it would help you visualize what the possibilities might be for using them in your own educational endeavors.

GIS and geographic inquiry

I my “previous life” I was a geoscientist. I worked in the petroleum industry as an exploration geophysicist, after earning a BS degree in Geology. Later in my career I became quite involved in using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology as decision support systems for assisting petroleum exploration professionals in making good decisions about possible new oil and gas reserves.

My dissertation study for my PhD was about whether people using GIS technologies as decision support tools make more effective decisions when the information they are considering has spatially referenced components (they do!).

I just discovered this article with a similar vein — how knowledge derived from (and therefore teaching about) GIS technology is beneficial to society, from business to education to sociology and beyond. I thought you might enjoy this link to the article (which really is a series of articles!):

GIS and Geographic Inquiry:
http://www.eschoolnews.com/resources/gis-and-geographic-inquiry/